Traps

Traps are baited or nonbaited stationary devices set on the bottom or, less frequently, in midwater. Fish enter the trap freely but are subsequently prevented from leaving. Large traps are more common in coastal waters while smaller traps may be deployed to greater depths.
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<i>Pots</i> consists of cages or baskets used to target shellfish, cephalopods, crustaceans, and reef fish. Pots are placed in multiple sets and the location of each pot is marked with a surface buoy. <i>Fyke nets</i> and <i>stow nets</i> are fixed to the bottom and rely on currents to bring fish into contact with them. Additionally, fyke nets use "wings" to guide the fish into mesh bags, where they are captured. Both types are most commonly set near shore. <i>Barriers, weirs, fences</i> and <i>corrals</i> are used in tidal areas and span the entirety of the water column. Fish enter through a narrow opening and are then trapped in a holding compartment.
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For more detailed information, please visit the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department <a href="http://www.fao.org/fishery/geartype/108/en" target="_blank"> traps </a> web page.

Displaying 21 - 30 of 53

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

US East Coast and Canadian Maritimes

Target catch: 

Various

Effect on bycatch species: 

Ropes with a breaking strength of 1,700 lbs or less could reduce life-threatening entanglements of North Atlantic Right whales by at least 72%. Right and humpback were entangled in ropes with stronger breaking strength than those involving minke whales.

Effect on target catch: 

N/A

Article: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Maine

Target catch: 

N/A

Effect on bycatch species: 

Interactions between the vertical line and the leading edge of a whale flipper model closest to the whale "body" resulted in significant damage to the flipper.

Effect on target catch: 

N/A

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Curacao

Target catch: 

Groupers and snappers

Effect on bycatch species: 

Short and tall gap traps reduced bycatch of bycatch fish by 74% and 80%, key herbivores by 58% and 50% and butterflyfish by 90% and 98%, respectively.

Effect on target catch: 

Catches of high-value fish were not affected

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Swedish coast

Target catch: 

Cod

Effect on bycatch species: 

Reduced sea bycatch to zero

Effect on target catch: 

Oval shaped SEDs and ones with larger rectangle opening increased catchability of pots

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Target catch: 

Snow crab

Effect on bycatch species: 

Effect on target catch: 

The 3-ply cotton 96-thread twine was the best performing twine. Over the study period, this twine rapidly declined in breaking strength. The total reduction was 63% of the initial strength. There was a statistical relationship between break

Article: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

Target catch: 

Crab and whelk

Effect on bycatch species: 

Minke whales decreased swimming velocity and altered bearing when approaching a rope, particularly when ropes were black and white; some minke's altered underwater swimming trajectories when passing ropes and produced low-frequency vocalizations.

Effect on target catch: 

None reported

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Mingan Archipelago, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec Canada

Target catch: 

Crab and whelk

Effect on bycatch species: 

Identified detection/reaction of minke whales to buoy ropes

Effect on target catch: 

Unknown

Bycatch species: 

Fishing Gear: 

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