Electromagnetic deterrents

Electromagnetic fields created in the vicinity of a fishing activity to deter interaction of non-target species with fishing gear, bait, or target species. For example, rare earth metals, such as cerium or lanthanide, are attached or imbedded into hooks (longline, hook and line etc.) in an effort to deter the incidental bycatch of sharks and rays (Tallack et al. 2009). The main prize of the 2006 Smart Gear competition run by the World Wildlife Fund was for a magnetic shark deterrent to be tested on pelagic longlines. Polet et al (2005) describe evaluations of an "electro-trawl" in which electric charges stimulated shrimp into moving upward from the sea floor into the path of the trawl mouth. In this approach, the space between the groundrope and the benthos might be increased without reducing target catch levels but decreasing the contact the trawl might have with some non-target benthic invertebrates and groundfish.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

South Carolina

Target catch: 

None reported

Effect on bycatch species: 

Neodymium-iron-boron magnets significantly reduced catches of Atlantic sharpnose shark and smooth dogfish.

Effect on target catch: 

There were no differences in the catch rates of several fish species, including Atlantic croaker, oyster toadfish, black sea bass and bluefish when magnets were used.

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

None reported

Effect on bycatch species: 

Metal affixed to baited hook significantly reduced catches of juvenile hammerhead sharks but not blue, shortfin mako, pelagic thresher, sandbar or tiger sharks

Effect on target catch: 

None reported

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Laboratory study

Target catch: 

Pacific halibut

Effect on bycatch species: 

Mischmetal reduced the likelihood of an attack or consumption of bait by spiny dogfish.

Effect on target catch: 

Did not affect halibut

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Alaska

Target catch: 

Pacific halibut

Effect on bycatch species: 

Slightly reduced bycatch of spiny dogfish

Effect on target catch: 

Did not affect catch of halibut

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

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